Daily Archives: May 14, 2012

Crack and dent

Like most new cars, this Scion has a graceful flowing body with very few straight lines. But that dimple just to the right of the license plate, that is a curve in the body the owner can do without.

The first two pictures show the damage … you might have to squint to see it, but its there, and more noticeable in person than in these pictures.

Picture three shows what we do more than anything else here at JMC AutoworX, what most body shops do more than anything else … sand. In the third picture the slight dent has been filled and the disembodied hand that I keep in the closet is hard at work sanding the filler smooth.

After the filler is sanded smooth and the lines of the car are restored, the repair is primed for protection. You can see the primer sprayed over the repaired area in the last picture.

After the primer dries we will run this car into the booth, get some white paint on the repairs, and it will be good to go … curves in the body where they should be … and no where else.

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A little of this, a little of that

This red blooded, all American muscle car arrived at the shop today for a little TLC before the Mustangs of Burlington car show this weekend. In the first picture the car looks pretty good. But a closer look, in pictures two and three, show a few little minor dings and scrapes the owner wants to get taken care of. After all, who wants to put their car in a car show with even a small dent in the side?

Photograph number four shows the bumper removed and the small dent filled in. We’ve obviously sanded on it, but there is more sanding to go before the car will be ready to paint.

While sanding on the filler, we also sanded on the bumper to smooth out the scuff marks so the bumper will be smooth for the paint that will follow. You can see the work we did on the bumper in picture five.

While the guys were sanding away on the car, I was in the booth dressing up the tail-lamps. We have a process where we just ever so lightly smoke the lenses of the tail-lamps and mark lights. Not enough to reduce the effectiveness of the tail- and brake-lamps, but the darkening adds some depth to the lamps for a subtle, but noticeable, effect.

Photograph six shows the light after sanding to rough up the plastic so the tint will stick. We use a PPG tint that is sprayed on, just like paint, for durability. Like painting a car, the surface must be prepared by roughing up the surface so the paint, or in this case, tint, has something to get its teeth into for adhesion.

Picture seven shows the tail-lamp after the tint has been applied. The difference is subtle but there. The tint is quite light from directly behind so as to not affect the light output from the assembly. But looking at if from a slight angle, as in picture eight, you can see the tint appears to darken up some, which makes the lights appear darker than they really are.

Picture nine demonstrates what happens after the lights are cleared to bring up the shine. The lights gain some depth and pizzazz that is missing from the stock tail-lamps without affecting the performance of the lights or breaking the bank.

While I was busy in the booth, the guys finished sanding the quarter panel of the Mustang, making it ready first to prime then to paint. You can see their handy-work in picture 10. The entire quarter panel has been sanded, making the paint appear dull and lifeless. We will blend the repair across the quarter rather than painting the entire panel, then clear the whole shebang, making the repair invisible.

Blending is a technique for painting a section of the car without leaving a hard line between the old paint and the new for the eye to see. Without this blending of the paints at the edge the eye might detect any slight shift in color from the old paint to the new. It is a little bit of painters slight-of-hand, but it works. The dullness of the rest of the panel will disappear when the clear is applied, restoring the luster to the paint it had prior to sanding.

The last photo, number eleven, is a trick battery cover the owner had made. We are going to paint that to match the exterior of the car … one of these simple, but custom, touches that makes a car special.

Tinted tail-lamps, custom battery holder … simple changes … but a dead giveaway that a true petrolhead owns this car.

Mustangs of Burlington car show

Don’t forget … the Mustangs of Burlington car show is this weekend, May 19th, at the Holly Hill. JMC AutoworX will be there with the JMC AutoworX Karmann Ghia as well as the debut show of Cassie and Karl’s fantastic 1969 Mustang Mach I.

Hope to see you there.

Click here for directions to the mall.

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