Category Archives: 1964 Mustang

This 1964 (and a half) Mustang has been in the family since 1977. An all original car, it is a father/son restoration project that has gotten out of hand.

Prime on

2013.02.22 - 1964 Mustang (1) 2013.02.22 - 1964 Mustang (2)Friday we were also able to get one of the Mustang fenders in final prime. Chris was able to get what body work needed to be done to this fender earlier this week and today we had a chance to prime it. We taped up the edges that we didnt want to re-prime, then Chase applied 3 final coats of urethane primer. Next step will be to block it out one more time then paint it. We have a busy week coming up so Im not sure we will be able to get any spraying done on here but we will sure try.

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You better slow your Mustang down!

2013.02.21 - Mustang (1) 2013.02.21 - Mustang (2) 2013.02.21 - Mustang (3) 2013.02.21 - Mustang (4) 2013.02.21 - Mustang (5) 2013.02.21 - Mustang (6) 2013.02.21 - Mustang (8) 2013.02.21 - Mustang (7)2013.02.21 - Mustang (9)Mustang Sally, a popular R &B song recorded by Mack Rice in 1965 when this car was just a few months old was  just as popular as the Mustang was. This has been a busy few days we have put in on this car. Today, although we dont have pictures of it, we blocked the tops of the hood and trunk, both doors and one of the fenders. All this comes down to sore shoulders and huge piles of used up sandpaper. After we blocked the outside of all those panels we started sanding the under sides of the hood trunk and doors. We had enough time left in the day to go ahead and get the trunk and hood trimmed out. This is the color the owner chose, Candy Apple Red off of the 1966 Mustang. After we sanded these panels we put them in the booth, wiped them down with a degreasing agent. This removes dust, oil, fingerprints and all other contaminates that would effect the finish. Chase then sprayed a coat of PPG urethane sealer followed by 3 coats of red and two coats of PPG clear. The close ups show how crisp and clean they turned out. If the owner likes the color, we will proceed with the doors and flip these panels over and get them sprayed. I am really pleased with how this project is moving along. Its not too often we start the blocking process and spray color the same week. The owner should be excited to see the progress.

WOW! Now we’re moving!

2013.02.20 - Mustang (1) 2013.02.20 - Mustang (2) 2013.02.20 - Mustang (3) 2013.02.20 - Mustang (4) 2013.02.20 - Mustang (5) 2013.02.20 - Mustang (6) 2013.02.20 - Mustang (7) 2013.02.20 - Mustang (8)We had another block party today, sorry you missed it! We pulled out some parts for the 1964 Mustang and got quite a bit of work done on them. We were able to block the hood, both doors and the trunk. After we blocked them we started the body work. As you can see they were in great shape. There were a few dents but hey Jack, this car is nearly 50 years old! After the panels were straightened, we broke the primer gun out and sprayed the final prime on them. From here these panels will get blocked out again and then they will be ready for paint.  A very good day on this Mustang. Smaller panels in good shape means we can move quickly and today shows it.

Black out

2013.02.05 - Mustang (1) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (2) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (3) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (4) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (5) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (6) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (7) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (8) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (9) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (10) 2013.02.05 - Mustang (11)Today we spent some time on the Mustang painting the engine compartment and applying a spray in bed liner in the trunk. Picture one is where we left off on Friday. The engine compartment and trunk received a nice coat of epoxy as well as the rest of the body on Friday. The body also received several coats of slick sand. We did not slick sand the trunk or engine compartment because there was no need to do so. We can paint right over the epoxy with great results. You can see Chase applying the almost flat paint to the engine compartment and the inside of the rear body panel in pictures 3, 4, 5 and 6. Pictures 7 and 8 show the finished results. Pictures 9, 10 and 11 show the trunk after the bed liner. I think the owner is really going to like this. Its clean, tough and easy to maintain.

One step at a time.

2013.01.24 - Mustang (1)2013.01.24 - Mustang (2)
2013.01.24 - Mustang (3) 2013.01.24 - Mustang (4) 2013.01.24 - Mustang (5) 2013.01.24 - Mustang (6)2013.01.24 - Mustang (7) 2013.01.24 - Mustang (8) 2013.01.24 - Mustang (9) 2013.01.24 - Mustang (10) 2013.01.24 - Mustang (11)As promised yesterday, we primed the doors today on the Mustang. Because they were prepped yesterday, all we had to do today was clean them, hang them and shoot a good coat of epoxy and and 3 coats of slick sand. We started by cleaning the doors with a wax and grease remover. This step removes any contaminates that get on the panel. Next was the epoxy. This is the water proofing product and the product that really bites into the metal for adhesion. Then we have slick sand. This is the high build primer that allows us to block out so the panels are super straight. We did not slick sand the inside of the doors because the slick sand would have filled in the textured grain of the interior and we didnt want that.

The last couple of hours in the day were spent cleaning out all of the old seam sealer in the cowl area.  That stuff had been there for  49 years. I figured its best to get it on out and put in some new since we were already here. Seam sealer is a glue type product that is made to fill in the weld seams to keep water from getting in there and either rusting or causing a water leak.  We didn’t get that far today on the body but we did get the seams  all cleaned out and ready to go. One step at a time.

Pony express!

2013.01.23 - Mustang (1) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (2) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (3) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (4) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (5) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (6) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (7) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (8) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (9) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (10) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (11) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (12) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (13) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (14) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (15) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (16) 2013.01.23 - Mustang (17)Phew!! What a day. Today we worked on the Mustang. Not just any Mustang, but one of the very first ones ever made. This is a 19641/2. We made great progress and hope to get more done tomorrow. In the first picture you see the hood, trunk, left fender and fender parts set up and ready for primer. Our first step is to clean the parts extremely well. We use a de-greasing solvent to remove any contaminates from the panels. Next we spray a coat of epoxy on the parts. The epoxy really likes bare metal. It is water proof and really bites to the metal. Next we spray 3 coats of Slick Sand on the outside of the body panels. This product is a very high build primer. It allows us to block the body panels out until they are super flat. The parts that are hanging up, we skipped this step and went straight to the urethane primer. Since they dont have the surface area the body panels have, we can prime them with regular prime and still get great results. In the last three pictures you can see Chris working on the doors. We did get the doors ready for this same process but we ran out of time. We will get those done tomorrow. Then we can start Chris’ favorite part, blocking!! The slick sand will be blocked with 80 grit paper to make the panels super straight. Next week we will start this process on the body. A major milestone will be reached then.

Return of the Mustang

2012.12.21 - Mustang (1) 2012.12.21 - Mustang (2) 2012.12.21 - Mustang (3)The ’64 Mustang arrived back at the shop after a visit to the media blaster and stay at the Throwback Custom Cars shop for some rust repair. The car wasn’t a rust bucket by any means but it is unreasonable, unless you live in the sunny southwest, to expect a nearly 50 year old car to be totally rust free.

Kelly and Josh Murphy, the fabricators at Throwback Custom Cars, replaced the right and left quarter panels, the black parts of the car, and performed a few other minor rust repairs.

Now that it is back at the shop we are going to have to get cracking on it.

Clean-up … aisle three

Today the Mustang left for media-blasting. Media-blasting is like sand-blasting except instead of shooting sand, the media-blaster shoots another material … such as tiny plastic beads. A media-blast performs the same function as a sand-blast, but it is much gentler on the metal of the car.

When this car returns in a couple of weeks it will free of paint, surface rust and crud … that unidentifiable stuff that all old cars seem to accumulate.

Then we can start with a clean slate for making this car something special.

Solid

When a car receives our High Performance Finish, we don’t just paint the outside. We take the car apart and paint as many of the pieces off the car as possible. This improves the quality of the work because we can paint the panels in places we normally can’t access … and it gives us a chance to correct any problems the car might have.

The first three photos show the Mustang being torn down. As you can see in the photos this is a very nice car. Solid is the word that comes to mind. Very little rust, and what rust there is is mostly surface rust. Having the car media-blasted will take care of that, and it will remove the old paint and dirt giving us a solid foundation on which to rebuild the paint job of the car.

Unfortunately, not all of the rust is just surface rust. You can see in the fourth photo one of the rust spots that will have to be repaired. Never-the-less, this is a super-solid car with less rust than most, one that is going to require relatively little metal work to put back right.

Webster defines solid as: (1) being without an internal cavity: (2) not interrupted by a break or opening

Yeah … I think solid describes this car pretty well.

Time to pony up

This all original 1964½ Ford Mustang arrived at the shop today for a make-over. A two owner car, the current owner has owned the car since 1977. After these many years the owner and his son have taken on the restoration as a father/son project.

The owner and his son will be doing all the mechanical work but we will be assisting by treating the car to a High Performance Finish.

After all, the 1964½ Ford Mustang is a motoring icon, and this is one of the nicer all original examples around. Why would anyone do anything less?

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